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Psychology Today

One way of thinking about loners is to ask whether people realize they are better off on their own, and if so, whether they are prepared to live authentically.
– by Bella DePaulo Ph.D.

To counter the polarized mind, we call for a mobilization of mindfulness practices and dialogue groups on a scale of a public works program for human civility.
– by Kirk J. Schneider Ph.D.

Job-seeking advice for new graduates, in context.
– by Marty Nemko Ph.D.

Research suggests 7 things to keep in mind when traveling with a partner that will help you maximize your chances of enjoying the vacation and strengthen your love.
– by Jelena Kecmanovic Ph.D.

Research suggests 7 things to keep in mind when traveling with a partner that will help you maximize your chances of enjoying the vacation and strengthen your love.
– by Jelena Kecmanovic Ph.D.

What’s more addicting than chocolate? What are the most addictive foods in the world? National survey data may surprise you!
– by Glenn Livingston Ph.D.

A professor responds to college parents’ concerns.
– by Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D.

Gaslighters/narcissists cause emotional and physical scars. They may have also impacted you in ways that you don’t realize yet.
– by Stephanie A. Sarkis Ph.D.

ScienceDaily

Nations with strong women’s rights are more likely to have better health and faster growth than those who don’t promote and protect these values.

The number of women using cannabis in the year before they get pregnant and early in their pregnancies is increasing, and their frequency of use is also rising, according to new data.

A biologist conducted a pioneering research study that could help us to better understand the role of dopamine in stress resilience in humans through analyzing wild songbirds. This study could lead to increased prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders.

A team scientists and physicians has identified a cellular connection between diabetes and one of its major complications — blood vessel narrowing that increases risks of several serious health conditions, including heart disease and stroke.

Biomedical engineers have found a way for people to get better shuteye. Systematic review protocols allowed researchers to analyze thousands of studies linking water-based passive body heating, or bathing and showering with warm/hot water, with improved sleep quality.

Either to check the time or waste time, people often look at their smartphones after waking in the middle of the night. While this acute burst of light does make it more difficult to fall back to sleep, a new study reports that it won’t interfere with the body’s overall circadian rhythms.

Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more – and may contribute to weight problems, a new study has found. The research also found that how snacks are presented (in a large or small container) has little influence on how much children snack.

Hearing loss has a profound impact on older people, as it can lead to anxiety, restricted activity, and perhaps even cognitive decline and dementia. Research has examined associations of hearing loss with outdoor activity limitations, psychological distress, and memory loss in people aged 65 and over. All three conditions were significantly worse when there was hearing loss. The findings support early interventions such as use of hearing aids.

Psych Central

I wondered if the bitter taste of the endings would overpower all the other memories of my first sober loves. I met C at the most inopportune moment imaginable: I…
– by Psych Central Guest Author

Ditch the notion that therapy sucks. I’m a bit biased about the positive effects of seeing a therapist, but I often have a new client come to me and say,…
– by Psych Central Guest Author

Higher levels of daily physical activity may protect against cognitive decline and neurodegeneration (brain tissue loss) in older adults at greater risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to new research…
– by Traci Pedersen

A new study finds that lower-income parents are less likely than their higher-income counterparts to involve their children in school- or community-based sports due to barriers such as rising costs…
– by Traci Pedersen

Twins born by cesarean birth may be at greater risk for cognitive problems, according to a new study at the University of Malaga (UMA) in Spain. The findings are published…
– by Traci Pedersen

This week’s Psychology Around the Net has the latest on a new virtual reality therapy trial for people diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, how people with mental health disorders are…
– by Alicia Sparks

Ever since I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in 1991, I’ve struggled with my weight. At that time, I weighed 125 and was prescribed lithium to control my highs and…
– by Laura Yeager

A gene linked to Alzheimer’s Disease may impact cognitive health as early as childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging. The effect appears to…
– by Traci Pedersen

APA News

Situations in which a therapist is presented with conflicting allegations of abuse, trauma or the undermining of a parent-child relationship can present ethical and clinical risks.

Students and early career professionals gain exposure to education and formal training in the areas of equity, diversity and inclusion, allowing them to serve as change-makers in a multi-generational workforce.

Adding psychologists to the DC Medicaid provider network will expand access to care.

Digital technology offers real hope for reaching more people with mental health care help.

APA PsycPORT

Aerobic exercise can enhance and improve cognitive function and stave off age-related brain changes.

Heartfelt talks between parent and child are essential to help kids overcome tough times.

There are tell-tale signs that a new mother may need to seek help.

The overall well-being in the United States has been in steady decline since 2016.

Brain disruptions that may contribute to autism could be happening in the first three months of fetal development.

Scientists have long found a possible link between anticholinergic drugs and an increased risk of dementia.

Those who identify as American Indian or Alaska Natives had the highest increase among all race and ethnicity groups, according to the research.

The American Psychoanalytic Association apologized for previously treating homosexuality as a mental illness.

NIMH

Dr. Deanna Barch will describe how sports involvement interacted with sex to predict depressive symptoms, and also how sports involvement was positively correlated with hippocampal volume in both boys and girls. Moreover, these relationships held even when correcting for family income, maternal education, race, ethnicity, age, and total brain volume. Dr. Barch’s findings will help illuminate a potential neural mechanism for the impact of exercise on the developing brain and the differential effects in girls versus boys.
– by National Institute of Mental Health

This meeting is intended for ALACRITY Center/Core Directors and investigators conducting or interested in conducting intervention or mental health services research.
– by National Institute of Mental Health

In this webinar, Dr. Lisa Horowitz reviews how to conducts suicide risk screening with the ASQ tool. This training is for nurses.
– by National Institute of Mental Health

Dr. Niko Kriegeskorte, a computational neuroscientist from the Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University, discusses the challenges of deriving insight into the principles of brain function using fMRI and other neuroimaging methods.
– by National Institute of Mental Health

In this Director’s message, Dr. Gordon digs into the historical roots of the hippocampus and the role it plays in human memory – an example of how scientists build upon past research discoveries and, in turn, advance the science that could benefit future generations.
– by Joshua Gordon

In this Director’s message, Dr. Gordon digs into the historical roots of the hippocampus and the role it plays in human memory – an example of how scientists build upon past research discoveries and, in turn, advance the science that could benefit future generations.
– by Joshua Gordon

In this Director’s Message, Dr. Gordon discusses research-based advances in the understanding and treatment of depression.
– by Joshua Gordon

One of the most horrific—and least acknowledged—effects of mass incarceration is the epidemic of mental illness in our jails and prisons. On June 13, 2019, Alisa Roth, journalist and author of Insane: America’s Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness, will explain how this happened—and how we can fix it. Phil Andrews is the Director of Crime Prevention Initiatives for the State’s Attorney’s Office of Montgomery County, Maryland. In January 2016, a Task Force chaired by Andrews released a report unanimously recommending the establishment of mental health courts at the Circuit and District levels to divert people who commit low-level crimes as a product of mental illness into treatment and services and away from prosecution and incarceration.
– by National Institute of Mental Health

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